DIY Pocketfold Wedding Invitations

     This is the first post in my wedding series, where I'll be sharing with you all the details of my upcoming wedding! From decorations and favors, to challenges and successes, I'll be keeping you all in the loop!

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     Get ready guys! This is the first of MANY posts coming about DIY wedding details. I finally put our invitations in the mail this afternoon and I couldn't be happier about how they turned out! I'll walk you through the steps that I took to make them, and show you how easy it really can be!

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     Before I decided whether I was going to buy my wedding invitations or attempt to make them myself, I first searched the wedding category on Pinterest and professional invitation websites to find some inspiration. I found a picture of a set of really cute  DIY Pocketfold invitations, and immediately fell in love with the idea (who doesn't LOVE pockets?), but unfortunately the picture didn't come along with a source or any instructions.

     I browsed some more,  and found an invitation design on Minted that I loved the simplicity of, but the invitations didn't have pockets, and I didn't like the fact that the invite and all of the inserts would have had the same exact image on each of them, and all the pieces also had really similar layouts. 

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   I looked around online and, sure enough, I could purchase blank pocketfold invitations in a few different styles almost any color I wanted. I ordered samples, and quickly texted my graphic design savvy sister and asked her if she'd be willing to help me out by designing the printed pieces of the invitation. She agreed to help, and it was officially decided that I was going to design and create my own wedding invitations.

     In order to include all of the information I needed to in the invitation, I was going to need the actual invitation piece, a double sided RSVP postcard, and an info card for our wedding website link, so that our guest could easily access travel and accommodations information, as well as view our registries. After some back and forth, my sister and I decided the best thing to do was to buy some digital art to use rather than putting pressure on her to create the perfect art in the short amount of time that we had. (Did I mention she's an artist too? She's pretty neat.) A quick search on Creative Market led me to these hand drawn floral designs**, and I knew right away that I had to use them, they were EXACTLY what I needed.

   Next I waited for my sister to do her magic, and then she emailed me PDF files of all the pieces I needed. (If you don't happen to have a graphic designer handy, it's something you can definitely do on your own in Microsoft Word or other software.) I also had her designs little 2" diameter coins that I could cut out and use to help hold the invitation closed.

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     The next step was to get the files printed. Because my designs were all fairly simple, I decided to go to the FedEx store to print them. A couple of words of advice: make sure to have someone experienced help you, and make sure you know exactly how large you want each piece to be. If you choose to do RSVP postcards, make sure they fit the USPS requirements. We ended up having to reprint a couple of pieces because they weren't the right size to fit in the pocket of the invitation and another because it was the wrong paper-weight. After about an hour though, we had everything we needed and I was ready to go home and finally start putting all of the different pieces together. 

     First, I used a two-inch diameter circle punch I found at Michael's to cut out the floral coins. Next, the invitations were glued to the pocketfold card, and the RSVP and Info cards went into the pocket (I added postage stamps to the RSVP postcards before the were placed into the invitation, in the hope that it will help the recipients to mail them back to us more quickly). I found ribbon in the perfect mint green at World Market, and hot glued strips of that to the floral coins to make a band to keep the assembled invitations closed. After all of that was done, all I had to do was print all the addresses on to the envelopes, stuff them, and bring them to the post office! 

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    I ended up spending about $65 (plus postage) for 25 invitations. Ordering them online would have cost me at least $200 to get the invites, RSVP postcards, and informational inserts. If I had to do all of this wedding planning over again, I think I would still do the invitations myself. While I did have some help with the graphic design, all of the steps were much easier than anticipated, and I saved almost $150. 

     Do you have any DIY card making or wedding projects you're proud of? Please share your stories with me in the comments!

    I hope you all are having a fantastic weekend. As always:

With love,
Julia Rose


**DISCLAIMER: After writing this post, I became a part of the Creative Partner program with Creative Market. If you make a purchase from them using my link, I will receive a small comission, but I would not recommend any product to you that I wouldn't use myself!